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Indigenous Australia: Terminology & Languages

What language do we (WAI) speak?

William Angliss is situated in the Kulin Nation where both languages Woi Wurrung and Boon Wurrung were spoken.

Some Boon Wurrung words

Did you know?

Boon Wurrung is the language spoken by one of the five tribes of the Kulin Nation. It shares over 90 per cent of its vocabulary with the Woiwurrung language

Source: https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/things-to-do/an-introduction-to-boon-wurrung-language-from-aunty-fay-stewart-muir

An introduction to Boon Wurrung language from Aunty Fay Stewart-Muir - Boon Wurrung elder and language specialist Aunty Fay Stewart-Muir shares ten words that were once spoken in the coastal region of Victoria stretching from Werribee River to Wilson’s Promontory.


Yana-bul ngargee-dha  - You are dancing

Yana-bul ngarnga-dha - You are hearing / listening

Marramb-ik - What is your name?

Djeembana  - A gathering place for many special occasions such as getting together to barter, arrange marriages, to create dances , to pass on knowledge and to catch up with extended families dan for new additions to family to be introduced.

Taarnuk ut-baany - Water in the billy

This is an invitation to share food with each other and sit around and share stories.

Moieties - There are two moieties in Boon Wurrung traditional group.  There is Bundjil the eagle, creator of all that you can see on country – the hills and mountains, waterways, rivers, creeks and billabongs. The trees that give shelter to various creatures, and wood and bark for the houses or weelams of the Boon Wurrung peoples. He also was called upon to settle disputes between people.

The other moiety is Waang the black crow. He is our protector of the waterways, rivers, creeks and billabongs. He makes sure that fresh water would run and be in plentiful supply for our people and the birds and animals.

Barring -buluk - Many footprints

Liwurruk-ik - Asking a person if she is a sister to someone.

Finding out about family and people in the family, who you are connected to.

Weelam-ik - My house, where do you live?

Birrarang-ga - River location. It’s a location of where you live. Country to First Nations people is very important to them. It’s our mother; she provides the food for us to survive. If we do not look after our mother she will not look after us.

Languages

Terminology

Offensive terms not to be used anytime 
  • 25%, 505 Aboriginal

  • Abo

  • ATSI

  • Blacks

  • Boong

  • Coconut

  • Coloured

  • Coon

  • Darky

  • Full-blood

  • Gin

  • Half-caste

  • Inferior

  • Jacki Jacki

  • Lubra

  • Mixed blood

  • Native

  • Nigger

  • Part- Aboriginal

  • Primitive

  • Quarter-caste

  • Savage

  • Sooty

  • Stone Age

  • Them

  • Them people

  • Those folk

  • Those people

  • Uncivilised

  • You people

*See also: "Using the right words: appropriate terminology for Indigenous Australian studies", in: Teaching the Teachers: Indigenous Australian Studies for Primary Pre-Service Teacher Education, School of Teacher Education, University of New South Wales, 1996.

Source: Creative Spirits. (n.d.). Appropriate words & terminology for Aboriginal topics.

Retrieved from https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/media/appropriate-terminology-for-aboriginal-topics

ffensive terms not to be used anytime

  • 25%, 50% Aboriginal
  • Abo
  • ATSI
  • Blacks
  • Boong
  • Coconut
  • Coloured
  • Coon
  • Darky
  • Full-blood
  • Gin
  • Half-caste
  • Inferior
  • Jacki Jacki
  • Lubra
  • Mixed blood
  • Native
  • Nigger
  • Part-Aboriginal
  • Primitive
  • Quarter-caste
  • Savage
  • Sooty
  • Stone Age
  • Them
  • Them people
  • Those folk
  • Those people
  • Uncivilised
  • You people

See also: "Using the right words: appropriate terminology for Indigenous Australian studies", in: Teaching the Teachers: Indigenous Australian Studies for Primary Pre-Service Teacher Education, School of Teacher Education, University of New South Wales, 1996.



Source: Appropriate words & terminology for Aboriginal topics - Creative Spirits, retrieved from https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/media/appropriate-terminology-for-aboriginal-topics

Offensive terms not to be used anytime

  • 25%, 50% Aboriginal
  • Abo
  • ATSI
  • Blacks
  • Boong
  • Coconut
  • Coloured
  • Coon
  • Darky
  • Full-blood
  • Gin
  • Half-caste
  • Inferior
  • Jacki Jacki
  • Lubra
  • Mixed blood
  • Native
  • Nigger
  • Part-Aboriginal
  • Primitive
  • Quarter-caste
  • Savage
  • Sooty
  • Stone Age
  • Them
  • Them people
  • Those folk
  • Those people
  • Uncivilised
  • You people

See also: "Using the right words: appropriate terminology for Indigenous Australian studies", in: Teaching the Teachers: Indigenous Australian Studies for Primary Pre-Service Teacher Education, School of Teacher Education, University of New South Wales, 1996.



Source: Appropriate words & terminology for Aboriginal topics - Creative Spirits, retrieved from https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/media/appropriate-terminology-for-aboriginal-topics

Offensive terms not to be used anytime

  • 25%, 50% Aboriginal
  • Abo
  • ATSI
  • Blacks
  • Boong
  • Coconut
  • Coloured
  • Coon
  • Darky
  • Full-blood
  • Gin
  • Half-caste
  • Inferior
  • Jacki Jacki
  • Lubra
  • Mixed blood
  • Native
  • Nigger
  • Part-Aboriginal
  • Primitive
  • Quarter-caste
  • Savage
  • Sooty
  • Stone Age
  • Them
  • Them people
  • Those folk
  • Those people
  • Uncivilised
  • You people

See also: "Using the right words: appropriate terminology for Indigenous Australian studies", in: Teaching the Teachers: Indigenous Australian Studies for Primary Pre-Service Teacher Education, School of Teacher Education, University of New South Wales, 1996.



Source: Appropriate words & terminology for Aboriginal topics - Creative Spirits, retrieved from https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/media/appropriate-terminology-for-aboriginal-topics
© Learning Resource Centre, William Angliss Institute. 555 La Trobe Street, Melbourne, Victoria, 3000 I t: 03 96062237 I e: lrc@angliss.edu.au