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Copyright @ William Angliss: FAQs

FAQs

1. How do I access Creative Commons materials on YouTube?

 Visit Smart Copying website which provides some helpful tips - Creative Commons materials on YouTube.

2. Where can I find images that are free to use?

Watch this short Creative Commons video and also see the suggestions under the Images tab above.

3. I found an image on the internet and the site says that I don't need to attribute or acknowledge it. Is this correct?

Many of the free CC images that are available on the internet are from overseas websites which often state that there is "no free to attribute or acknowledge" the images. This is NOT the case in Australia as our copyright rules are different, and mean that you must always attribute CC material, or material from the public domain, even if the original owner says that you don't need to.

4. Do I still need to attribute an image if I have already cited my sources?

Yes. Attribution and citation or referencing are actually two different things, so both are required.

Attribution gives credit to the creator of an image or other material, and is a must!

If you want to see examples of how to attribute and reference a reproduced, reprinted or adapted images, you can visit APA 7th Style Guide Reproduced, Reprinted or Adapted Images (pp.5-8).

5. What referencing style do I use?

William Angliss is currently using APA 7th edition as our Referencing Style. If you want to see examples of how to attribute and reference a reproduced, reprinted or adapted images, you can visit APA 7th Style Guide Reproduced, Reprinted or Adapted Images (pp.5-8).

6. Do I need to attribute my own photos?

If you take a photo (or produce a drawing) you will own the copyright to it. You do not need to attribute your own photos under Australian copyright law, however it is a good idea to indicate that a photo is your own when using it in an assignment.  If you want to see examples of how to attribute and reference a reproduced, reprinted or adapted images, you can visit APA 7th Style Guide Reproduced, Reprinted or Adapted Images (pp.5-8).

7. Is everything that is in the Internet freely available to use?

No. You should always check the copyright status of materials which you find on the internet to make sure that your intended use is permitted. Whilst materials published on the internet are publicly accessible, it is important to remember that they are not necessarily free of copyright restrictions or in the 'public domain'.

8. What does 'public domain' mean?

There are a lot of misunderstandings about what is meant by 'public domain' when referring to copyright work. Materials fall into the public domain once copyright expires, which is generally 70 years after the death of the creator of the material.

Contact your Copyright Officer